happy/boomf/fat

for any number of performers eating marshmallows

Larry Goves

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£6.99

for any number of performers eating marshmallows

£6.99
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Composer Larry Goves
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Year of Composition

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Catalogue ID ce-lg1hbf1

Notes

happy/boomf/fat is a music performance piece with some theatrical features for any number of trained or untrained voices. The piece is a performance of a printed musical score that consists of nine distinct units: three text scores, three notated scores (albeit not traditionally notated), and three graphic scores (although all the scores have graphic and text features).

The piece is also printed on marshmallows and is eaten while it is sung.

As the piece is eaten the marshmallow dramatically affects the sound of the singing voice acting as both a varying sonic filter and as a sound producing object in its own right (for example, the sound of saliva, mastication, and falling marshmallow debris).

The lyrics (happy, fat, boomf) were chosen for their playfulness, simplicity, plosive qualities, and the embedded musical dynamic abbreviation (i.e. the pp in happy, the mf in boomf and the f in fat). The performance is ordered as different text/graphics catches each performance attention differently however as the piece is eaten the music become less varied.

The piece is primary concerned with overconsumption and excess with starting points including: varying readings of material agency (including the comedic, sinister, linguistic [J. Robb, T. Ingold, A. Jones, N. Boivin etc.]); Kaloust Guedel’s Excessivism Manifesto (2015) (and related visual artworks); and Marco Ferreri’s 1973 film La Grande Bouffe (which centres on four friends who decide to eat themselves to death). In particular this explores the addition of fetish to anthropological readings of material agency (Jones, A. and Boivin, N (2010) The Malice of Inanimate Objects: Material Agency). The piece is also concerned with body image, social mores around eating, and addresses what it is for an artist to put themselves (as performer and subject matter) at the heart of a music performance piece.